Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo – Been and Gone

 

Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo

 

The Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos were out and about in the northern suburbs for several weeks again, and now they’ve disappeared as quickly as they arrived.

Feed Time

Feed Time

They seem to come in early spring and feast on the flowers and bushes in the reserves.  I think it’s the time of year now when they breed, so maybe they fill up before flying off to their breeding grounds.

On the Lookout

On the Lookout

It’s really hard to think of them as being on the critically endangered list when they are so obvious in the area.  They’re very noisy, they travel in huge flocks sometimes, and they let me get within a few metres of them when they’re feeding.  When I think of endangered animals, I tend to think of solitary, shy animals that live in really remote places that will be very hard to spot.  But the cockatoos make sure that everyone knows when they arrive.

Carnaby's Black Cockatoo flying over

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo flying over

The picture below was taken in Quinns Rocks, and you can see how big the flocks are.  I counted over 200 together on the reserve that day.  Their numbers have halved over the past 50 years though, so there are huge conservation efforts to try and increase their numbers again.  Hopefully, in a few months time, they’ll be back again but with some youngsters with them too.

Flocks in the Suburbs

Flocks in the Suburbs

 

 

3 responses to “Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo – Been and Gone”

  1. Damien says:

    May God bless us to keep you alive Cockatoos. Keep highlighting my days each time you come across my way. Thank you.

  2. Sue says:

    Thanks Damien. It’s great now they are back again in the area with their young.

  3. Stephen says:

    thanks for the great photos and informative website. I too arrived in Aust (Sydney) in 2010 and like you am now an avid birder. The wildlife here is amazing and the diversity of birdlife, even in the urban fringes is staggering. I’m still finding new species on each trip out.
    I’d love to see a budgie in the wild and the Carnaby’s black cockatoo.
    I’ll keep visiting to see what else you have discovered.
    Stephen

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