Denmark Trip – Part 1

Western Rosella

Western Rosella

My recent trip to Denmark wasn’t as far afield as you might imagine, as it’s on the south coast of Western Australia, not the European one.  I stayed in a cabin on built stilts, on the side of a hill, in woodland, so from one side of the house the view was directly into the tree tops.  There was a bird feeder on the balcony and we had lots of visitors to it, including some surprises.  The rosella (above) was one of them.  It’s the first time I’ve seen them since we moved here and there was a whole family who were regular visitors.

White-browed Babbler

White-browed Babbler

The rosella wasn’t the only first for us.  This babbler was one of a group of about 7 who came noisily through the woods

Red-winged Fairy-wren

Red-winged Fairy-wren

This red-winged fairy-wren and his family was another regular visitor.  I have to say he looks just the same as several other fairy-wrens (blue-breasted, variegated, lovely) and I’m only guessing red-winged because of our location.

Common Bronzewing

Common Bronzewing

Another frequent visitor to the bird table was this lovely bronzewing.  There were quite a few of them and they were easily chased off the feeders by the gallahs, so they quite often fed on the forest floor beneath, picking up the seeds that the other birds were dropping.

White-naped Honey-eater

White-naped Honey-eater

These honey-eaters were also new to me – white-naped honey-eaters.

Gallah Chicks

Gallah Chicks

The most common visitors to the feeder, and the whole of the balcony, were the gallahs.  At one point we had 22 gallahs on there, all queuing up for a feed.  In the woods I found the reason they were so hungry. This one had been eating for at least 3. The parents seemed to be feeding, then regurgitating food for their very noisy chicks. You can just see one peeping out of the nest hole.

Gallah

Gallah

 

Birds Eye View

Osprey

Osprey     Getting a Birds Eye View

I haven’t posted for a few weeks because I haven’t been out very much, because of the rubbish weather.  It’s good for the region because it had been so dry for so long, and the birds don’t care, but I like the big blue sky and hope we get better weather soon.

The good news is that I see the ospreys regularly now, so I’m hoping that in a month or so they might nest again nearby.  The one above was less than a kilometre from the marina, on a fishing trip.

White-Winged Fairy-Wrens

White-Winged Fairy-Wrens

While I was trying to get a photo of the osprey, the fairy-wrens very kindly came to me.  The male’s breeding plumage is almost complete, but not quite.

Splendid Fairy-Wren

Splendid Fairy-Wren

I went to Yanchep National Park and the splendid Fairy-Wren was also putting on a show.

Spoonbill

Spoonbill

 

The water birds were out in force, including this spoonbill.  The spoonbill didn’t appear to be making a nest, but didn’t seem to want to give up his stick either.

 

 

 

Ducklings

Ducklings

 

 

It’s always a treat to see ducklings, and this mother had 15 tiny ducklings to care for.  I don’t know when they’d hatched but it must have been very recently.

 

Australian Shelducks

Australian Shelducks

 

 

The shelducks seemed happy to make the most of the break in the rain to sit and sun themselves on the rocks.

 

 

Pelican
Pelican

 

 

The pelican also seems to be happy to get the sun on his back for a while.  It’s raining again at the moment, fingers crossed for some sunshine and dry days next week.

 

Fairy-Wrens – A Fantastic Show

Splendid Fairy Wren (Male)

Splendid Fairy Wren (Male)

It’s been a fantastic week for Fairy-Wrens, and this one certainly lives up to his name – ‘Splendid’.  His colours really are amazing.

You may remember that the Fairy-Wren featured on my Top 10 Classic Australian Bird list.  Pictures of them appear on so many items like on calenders, mugs and tea towels.  I was keen to see them but, since I arrived, I hadn’t seen the males in their breeding colours.

Male Splendid Fairy-Wren

Male Splendid Fairy-Wren

 

This male was showing off at Yanchep National Park.  Not the least bit concerned about me, or even my umbrella, he was out in the open for more than 5 minutes.  I’m sure he would have let me get closer to photograph him, but he was in the tiger snake reserve so I decided that the lawns were close enough.

 

Splendid Fairy-Wren (Female)
Splendid Fairy-Wren (Female)

 

There were 5 others with him.  This was one of the females. There may also have been immature males in the group who look very much like the females.

 

 

White-Winged Fairy-Wren (Male)
White-Winged Fairy-Wren (Male)

 

This little White-winged Fairy-Wren put in an appearance on the coastal path the following day, giving me a great opportunity to get a photo for a comparison.  He wasn’t quite such a show off.  He spent more time in the bushes and moved about very quickly, so it was a bit harder to get a photo.

White-Winged Fairy-Wren (Female)

White-Winged Fairy-Wren (Female)

 

He also had several others in his group.  This was one of the females.

There are still several types of fairy-wrens left for me to see, but I’m really happy with the ones I’ve seen this week.

White-Winged Fairy-Wren (Male)