Elegant Parrot and other New Birds

Elegant Parrot

Elegant Parrot

Every so often I realise that its ages since I’ve seen any ‘new’ birds that I haven’t seen before, and I think that it’s inevitable as time goes on that seeing new birds will become less frequent.  Then I see several new birds in a short time and realise just how many I’ve never seen.  So here’s an update on several new sightings from a very short time.  The elegant parrot above was one of a pair that I came across in Franklin Park (a tiny reserve) in Wanneroo.  They were quite shy and it was quite hard to get a clear picture at that distance.

Red-Capped Robin

Red-Capped Robin

 

I’ve wanted to see a red-capped robin since I came across one in my book.  I wrongly assumed that they would be as common and as friendly as a British robin, but not so.  He was just as pretty though and let me follow him for a few minutes.

 

Australian Hobby

Australian Hobby

 

This little bird of prey was quite happy to sit still while I took pictures, maybe because he was so high up.  He was in another tiny reserve called Caporn Park in Wanneroo.  He’s another one that I’ve seen pictures of before, and I saw in a bird of prey display, but I’ve never seen in the wild before.

 

Cuckoo-Shrike

Cuckoo-Shrike

I’ve seen one of these, a black-faced cuckoo-shrike, before.  I even have some photos of them, but they have always stayed so far away that the photos are poor, so I’ve never had one that was fit to post on here.  This one was also in Caporn Park and also happy to be photographed.  It was one of a pair who moved between trees around us for at least 10 minutes before we left.

 

Black-fronted Dotterel
Black-fronted Dotterel

 

I went walking at Yanchep and saw 16 of these pretty little birds by the edge of the lake.  I had to look them up when I got home.  When I zoomed in close on the photos of the birds on the lake I found they were a different type of dotterel – they were red-kneed dotterels.  And while I was taking pictures, a spoonbill dropped in for lunch.

Red-Kneed Dotterels at Yanchep Lake

Red-Kneed Dotterels at Yanchep Lake

 

 

 

Caversham Wildlife Park

Barking owl

Caversham Wildlife Park – Barking owl

This week’s pictures are of captive birds.  We had an outing over the Easter break to Caversham WIldlife Park, mainly to see the koalas and wombats.  I had no idea how big it was or how much there was to see and do there.  As well as all the marsupials there were lots of native birds on show.

Sooty owl

Sooty owl

 

 

In one of the ‘meet and greet’ sessions there were owls and ‘parroty types’.  Feel free to correct me if I’ve identified them wrongly.

Frogmouth

Frogmouth

 

 

 

 

I love being stared out by owls.  This one is a frogmouth.  I’m still not entirely sure whether a frogmouth is an owl or not.

Major Mitchell's Cockatoo

Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo

 

 

 

 

 

Electus Parrot

Electus Parrot

 

 

 

 

 

The parrots and cockatoos were entertaining as ever – so intelligent and playful.

 

Upside down
Upside down

 

 

 

 

 

They  were keen not to be out-done by the wombat and were showing off their best moves for us.

Masked Lapwing

Masked Lapwing

 

 

 

Then outside there were enclosures with birds from different states.

 

Bush stone-curlew

Bush stone-curlew

 

 

 

 

 

This stone-curlew was fairly well hidden until it started to stand up.  If it hadn’t moved I may have missed it.

 

 

 

I couldn’t end without showing the cutest marsupial of the day.  It’s called a bettong – a tiny, tiny kangaroo.  It was surrounded by visitors, but just fell asleep, upside down, in the arms of its keeper.  With his feet in the air, he quite happily slept through the action as all the visitors gently stroked his tummy.

Sleepy head

Sleepy head

 

Australian Ringneck

Australian Ringneck Eating

Australian Ringneck Eating

Australian Ringneck, Ringnecked Parrot, Twenty-Eight, Ringnecked Parakeet.  I struggled over what to call this post as the birds seem to have plenty of different names.  I went for ‘Australian Ringneck’ in the end as that’s what my book gave as a name that covers both that you can see here.

 

Twenty-Eight, Feeding

Twenty-Eight, Feeding

‘Twenty-eight, Twenty-eight’ is the call that the common local subspecies makes as he flies through the trees, hence his nickname.  I often see them but very rarely get a good picture – it really shouldn’t be that hard.  They usually seem to fly in twos or threes.  Then they land high in the trees to feed, where they are obscured by leaves and branches.  This parrot is definitely a ‘Twenty-eight’ as he has a dark green chest.

 

Australian Ringneck

Australian Ringneck

 

This one however, is probably a true ringneck because of his yellow chest.  It’s almost impossible to know though because they interbreed, so in-between markings are common.  Like the other parrots they chatter to each other constantly as they feed.

 

Ringneck

Ringneck

 

They aren’t nearly as confident as most of the other parrots and cockatoos that I’ve come across and they aren’t as ‘cheeky’.  Far more sensible, and far more focused on their feeding.  So much so that they won’t stand still for a picture.  There were 3 of them feeding by a tree but every one of the photos with more than 1 on was blurred or out of focus because they just can’t be still.  They’re really pretty though and it’s a treat when they feed on the floor and let me get close.